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dc.contributor.authorWhite, Steven
dc.contributor.editorPeter Sankoff, Steven White, Celeste Black
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-05T22:14:23Z
dc.date.available2018-11-05T22:14:23Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-09-30T05:49:16Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781862879300en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/59554
dc.description.abstractThe legal status of animals - reflected in their property status, the prohibition of cruelty, the imposition of duties of care, and so on - implicitly raises important questions about the moral significance of animals. The ways in which the law regulates the treatment of animals arguably reflects, even if imperfectly, society's moral regard for animals. Importantly, law may also be constitutive of our understanding of the place of animals in the world, helping to normalise our understanding of their moral significance. At common law, domesticated animals are classified as personal property. However, the existence of animal welfare legislation in all Australasian jurisdictions suggests that animals have greater moral significance than their formal legal classification as personal property might suggest. Contrary to an understanding of animals as mere objects, even those philosophers who are most sceptical about an expansive moral standing for animals accept that the imposition of gratuitous suffering on an animal is wrong. However, with the possible exception of companion animals, where duties of care are legislatively imposed on animal guardians in some jurisdictions, the law generally goes no further than protection against gratuitous cruelty. And it may even fall short of this standard when the issue of what constitutes a 'good reason' for imposing suffering on an animal is closely examined.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherThe Federation Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.federationpress.com.au/bookstore/book.asp?isbn=9781862879300en_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleAnimal Law in Australasiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapternumbers16en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom31en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto60en_US
dc.relation.ispartofeditionSeconden_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLawen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180199en_US
dc.titleExploring Different Philosophical Approaches to Animal Protection in Lawen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionBook Chapter (Non-Composite)en_US
dc.type.codeb2en_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education and Lawen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Federation Press. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. It is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher’s website for further information.en_US
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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