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dc.contributor.authorGibson, Margaret
dc.contributor.editorDavid Birch
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-02
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-05T03:12:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-02T00:43:47Z
dc.date.available2017-03-02T00:43:47Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.date.modified2014-06-05T03:12:03Z
dc.identifier.issn1-35-0330
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10350330124540
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/59898
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses the technology of polygraph machines and lie detector tests in relation to the body as a specific site of truth investments. It discusses the way the machine is imagined or constituted in popular culture and scientific literature as a means of discovering guilty knowledge or getting the truth objectively and painlessly. It argues that the history of this technology turns truth or the sign of concealed knowledge into a bodily manifestation that is graphically capturable and ultimately readable. The graphic tracings multiply the scene or site of confession from a voluntary or involuntary verbal process to a bodily one. This technology does not operate on a model of truth represented through the body, where it is imagined as hidden within the interior of the body an interior that houses or contains secrets. On the contrary, whether for better or worse, this technology constitutes truth or the sign of deception as an animate, graphic sign in and through a body that speaks. Breathing patterns, pulse rates and secretions of sweat are constituted as meaningful, and this opens the way for potentially limitless decipherability.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom61
dc.relation.ispartofpageto73
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial Semiotics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication and Media Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCultural Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Language, Communication and Culture
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2001
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2002
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2099
dc.titleThe Truth Machine: polygraphs, popular culture and the confessing body
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codec1x
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorGibson, Margaret


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