Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMathers, NJ
dc.contributor.authorXu, ZH
dc.contributor.editorJay C. Bell, H. Insam
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:31:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:31:24Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.date.modified2009-09-02T07:41:20Z
dc.identifier.issn0016-7061
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0016-7061(02)00339-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5994
dc.description.abstractSolid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, with cross-polarisation (CP) and magic angle spinning (MAS), was used to characterize soil organic matter (SOM) in a 2-year-old exotic pine plantation of subtropical Queensland, Australia, under two contrasting harvest residue management regimes. Soil samples were collected from the 0-10 cm depth of experimental plots receiving either no harvest residues (no harvest residues) or the double quantity of harvest residues applied (double harvest residues). Carbon-13 CP and dipolar dephasing (DD) NMR techniques were able to detect differences in SOM composition and quality under the two contrasting residue treatments. The SOM under no harvest residues displayed an increased extent of decomposition, as determined by the alkyl C/O-alkyl C (A/O-A) ratio, and lower potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN), organic C, total P and total N contents. The CP spectra displayed little evidence of strong aromatic signals derived from lignin or tannin structures. This was confirmed by the DD spectra, which rapidly lost signal in the methoxyl and alkyl C regions, indicating protein and amide structures with little mobility might be dominant in the aromatic spectral region. The DD spectra also indicated that SOM under double harvest residues might have a small amount of condensed tannin structures, which did not exist in the SOM under no harvest residues. The carbonyl C region displayed resonances indicative of oxalate, carboxyl, amide and ester C in both treatments. Overall, the results of this study indicate that residue removal following harvest of exotic pine plantations on low-fertility soils in subtropical Australia can remove valuable nutrients from the site, which in turn may increase the extent of decomposition, leading to decreased SOM quality in subsequent rotations.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/503332/description#description
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom19
dc.relation.ispartofpageto31
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGeoderma: an international journal of soil science
dc.relation.ispartofvolume114
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Archaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.titleSolid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy: characterization of soil organic matter under two contrasting residue management regimes in a 2-year-old pine plantation of subtropical Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.date.issued2003
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorXu, Zhihong
gro.griffith.authorMathers, Nicole


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record