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dc.contributor.authorSchmid, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLing, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKolbe, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWesley, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMills, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLaing, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPattemore, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrimwood, K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:13:31Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:13:31Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2014-06-12T23:42:12Z
dc.identifier.issn1399-3003en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1183/09031936.00099508en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/60110
dc.description.abstractPseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF). Although most patients harbour unique P. aeruginosa isolates, some clinics report patients sharing common strains. The overall importance of person-to-person transmission in P. aeruginosa acquisition and whether routine patient segregation is necessary remains uncertain. The present authors therefore investigated the extent of P. aeruginosa transmission in New Zealand CF clinics. New Zealand's seven major CF centres were assessed, combining epidemiological data with computer-assisted SalI DNA fingerprinting of 496 isolates from 102 patients. One cluster of related isolates was significantly more prevalent in the largest clinic than expected by chance. The seven patients with isolates belonging to this cluster had more contact with each other than the remaining patients attending this centre. No other convincing evidence of transmission was found in any of the other smaller clinics. Three P. aeruginosa strains believed to be transmissible between patients in Australian and British CF clinics are present in New Zealand, but there was no definite evidence they had spread. Pseudomonas aeruginosa transmission is currently infrequent in New Zealand cystic fibrosis clinics. This situation could change rapidly and ongoing surveillance is required. The current results confirm that computer-assisted SalI DNA fingerprinting is ideally suited for such surveillance.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherEuropean Respiratory Societyen_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1583en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1590en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEuropean Respiratory Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume32en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.titlePseudomonas aeruginosa transmission is infrequent in New Zealand cystic fibrosis clinicsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the authors for more information.en_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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