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dc.contributor.authorClarke, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMcAuley, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-20T12:00:35Z
dc.date.available2017-11-20T12:00:35Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.date.modified2014-06-17T04:52:11Z
dc.identifier.issn1368-3500
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13683500.2013.823918
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/60439
dc.description.abstractThe heritage and tourism appeal of the First World War (1914-1918) battlefield sites holds similarities with past capital cities' attractions and the cultural heritage, built structure and commemorative events fostered by government-backed narrative. Governments and associated institutions manage and communicate the 'dominant narrative' of official culture that generally concerns moral and emotional aspects of history, myths or legends. On the other hand, the 'little narrative' or vernacular attributed to individuals complements and enriches the significance of official narrative and links closely to public memory. Vernacular narrative derives from personal information, family history, diaries and privately held records that eventually become part of the dominant, government narrative. The combination of these narratives contributes to the continually emerging and reassembled discourse of the First World War because it links local and foreign people with one another in seemingly viable and tangible ways. The narrative passed from generations with first-hand experience to the present day intergenerational narrative that enhances the austere facts of history. Battlefield visitors are active consumers of historical events and builders of meaning that generate from a broad spectrum of sources covering government, ancestors and family. Consequently, events such as the Fromelles Interment highlight the impact of planning, promotion and management of specific tourism events by governments, various contributing agencies, the press and the general public. The idea of an interment moves away from thanatourism to the concept of restorative or reflexive nostalgic tourism because visitors related to the relaxed, festive atmosphere of the Fromelles ceremony as well as the dominant narrative behind this unique, singular event of remembrance. The Fromelles story, the creation of a new cemetery and the visitors' insights are unique because such an event is unlikely to be repeated for any other First World War battlefield.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1103
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1119
dc.relation.ispartofissue11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCurrent Issues in Tourism
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTourism not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTourism
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150699
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1505
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1506
dc.titleThe Fromelles Interment 2010: dominant narrative and reflexive thanatourism
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Marketing
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorClarke, Peter D.


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