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dc.contributor.authorRigner, J
dc.contributor.authorDekker, S
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-05
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-23T03:56:56Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-02T01:01:09Z
dc.date.available2017-03-02T01:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.date.modified2014-06-23T03:56:56Z
dc.identifier.issn1050-8414
dc.identifier.doi10.1207/S15327108IJAP1004_1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/60745
dc.description.abstractFlight deck automation has generated new training requirements, most of which have been absorbed by in-house airline training, in particular, aircraft transition training. This leaves little room for learning about how human roles have shifted in automated cockpits or how the distinction between technical and nontechnical skills has become blurred when managing the flight path of an automated aircraft. This article explores how overall pilot training quality, efficiency, and effectiveness would benefit from pulling automation training forward into the pilot training curriculum, reducing the burden carried mainly by transition training today. This article examines various stages of pilot training (including ab initio, multicrew cooperation, and crew resource management training) and lays out the opportunities and obstacles they contain for the integration of flight deck automation. In conclusion, airlines themselves can play a constructive role by specifying what kinds of automation learning requirements earlier pilot training stages should cover, and by sharing their automation philosophies and actively taking part in the design of the preairline training. Such participation from an airline can help achieve appropriate knowledge and attitudes toward automation among its future pilots.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTAaylor and Francis
dc.publisher.placeUK
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom317
dc.relation.ispartofpageto326
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Aviation Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIndustrial and Organisational Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170107
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleSharing the Burden of Flight Deck Automation Training
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codec1x
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorDekker, Sidney


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