Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBrincat, Shannon
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:14:49Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:14:49Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2014-08-26T05:53:15Z
dc.identifier.issn13540661
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1354066110373838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/60820
dc.description.abstractDialectics remains an underutilized methodology in contemporary IR theory, which represents a significant limitation to the study of world politics, particularly in under-standing processes of transformation and change - an oversight that this article intends to redress. This article has two primary goals. First, it aims to reconstruct and build upon the small but robust debate concerning the validity of dialectics in IR that has been championed previously by Alker and Biersteker, and Heine and Teschke, respectively. Second, it contrasts dialectical and deterministic approaches to IR, as exemplified in Coxian Critical Theory and neo-realism, as a means to showcase the merits of the former as an approach to the study of social change in world politics. The ultimate aim of the article is to offer the groundwork of a social-relational dialectical approach to world politics that is focused on the intersubjective engagements between human beings, which can be developed in future research. Through such an analytic, the dialectical processes in social life are shown to be open-ended and the article rejects any understanding of 'inevitable' progress/regress or teleological end point. On the one hand, this account of dialectics promises greater analytical potential for understanding processes of change in world politics but, on the other, indicates the potential for the irrational toleration of contradiction and antagonism as an accepted feature of social life. Ultimately, the article argues that the skilled dialectician should emphasize human agency and intersubjectivity within a social-relational dialectical approach to world politics.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent300601 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom679
dc.relation.ispartofpageto703
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEuropean Journal of International Relations
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relations
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.titleTowards a Social-Relational Dialectic for World Politics
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 SAGE Publications. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBrincat, Shannon K.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record