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dc.contributor.authorLewis, Cynan
dc.contributor.authorSouvlis, Tina
dc.contributor.authorSterling, Michele
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-11T01:53:54Z
dc.date.available2018-01-11T01:53:54Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2014-06-23T03:59:30Z
dc.identifier.issn1836-9553
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1836-9553(11)70019-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/60826
dc.description.abstractQuestion Is Strain-Counterstrain treatment combined with exercise therapy more effective than exercise alone in reducing levels of pain and disability in people with acute low back pain? Design Randomised trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants 89 (55 female) participants between 18 and 55 years experiencing acute low back pain were randomised to experimental (n = 44) and control (n = 45) groups. Intervention Participants attended four treatments in two weeks. The experimental group received Strain-Counterstrain treatment and review of standardised exercises (abdominal bracing, knee to chest, and lumbar rotation). The control group performed the standardised exercises under supervision. Following the intervention period, all participants received exercise progression, manual therapy, and advice. Outcome measures The primary outcome was the modified Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire, measured at 2 weeks (ie, end of treatment), 6 weeks, and 28 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included the SF-36, visual analogue scale pain ratings, and a 7-point global rating of change. Results The experimental intervention was not more effective than exercise alone in reducing levels of pain and disability. Mean between-group differences in change from baseline for the Oswestry Disability Index were 0 (95% CI -6 to 7) after treatment, -1 (95% CI -7 to 6) at 6 weeks, and 2 (95% CI -4 to 8) at 28 weeks. Other outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusion There is no advantage in providing Strain- Counterstrain treatment to patients with acute low back pain, although further studies could examine whether a subset of these patients can benefit from the treatment.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom91
dc.relation.ispartofpageto98
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Physiotherapy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.titleStrain-Counterstrain therapy combined with exercise is not more effective than exercise alone on pain and disability in people with acute low back pain: A randomised trial
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association, published by Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSterling, Michele


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