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dc.contributor.authorBrincat, Shannonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:14:49Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:14:49Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2014-06-23T04:00:04Z
dc.identifier.issn0260-2105en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0260210509008663en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/60840
dc.description.abstractThis article aims to reinvigorate the utopian imagination as a vital and necessary component in IR theory. Since the First Great Debate between the Realists and the Utopianists (or more accurately, the Liberal-Internationalists) the utopian tradition has been viewed as being both subjective and arbitrary, leading to its dismissal as vain idealism in world politics. This article re-interrogates the arguments of Carr and Morgenthau and finds that they have relevance today only as against closed systems of utopia and have little bearing against the open-dialectical utopianism which is advocated here as a viable alternative to the sterility of realism. The article also examines the historical nexus between realism's dismissal of utopianism and the wider movements in political philosophy via a critical engagement with the works of Popper, Berlin and Arendt. Finally, after exploring the limitations of Booth's idea of 'Utopian Realism', the article argues that utopianism should no longer be assumed to be a blueprint for a future, perfect society, a tradition fraught with the danger of proto-totalisation, but as a critical imaginary that acts as a heuristic device to reveal the fissures in existing reality and as an ideational motivating force for progressive change in world politics.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom581en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto609en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalReview of International Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume35en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleReclaiming the Utopian Imaginary in IR Theoryen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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