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dc.contributor.authorWestaway, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorP. Groves, Colinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:44:35Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:44:35Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2014-07-21T05:11:40Z
dc.identifier.issn00038121en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/j.1834-4453.2009.tb00051.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/61466
dc.description.abstractThe mark of Ancient Java refers to the persistence of Homo erectus traits from Javan populations in fossil Homo sapiens Australian crania. This paper argues that hybridization of these two species is unlikely, first because the evidence for chronological overlap is very weak and second because phylogenetic analysis (cladistics and splits network) incorporating the earliest fossils of modern humans from Africa and the Levant indicate no close genetic relationship between a Ngandong-like population from Java and 26 late Pleistocene Australian fossils from the Willandra Lakes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom84en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto95en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalArchaeology in Oceaniaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume44en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode210199en_US
dc.titleThe mark of Ancient Java is on none of themen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorWestaway, Michael


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