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dc.contributor.authorCox, Gregory R.
dc.contributor.authorClark, Sally A.
dc.contributor.authorCox, Amanda J.
dc.contributor.authorHalson, Shona L.
dc.contributor.authorHargreaves, Mark
dc.contributor.authorHawley, John A.
dc.contributor.authorJeacocke, Nikki
dc.contributor.authorSnow, Rodney J.
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Wee Kian
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Louise M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:59:29Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:59:29Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2014-07-22T04:32:00Z
dc.identifier.issn87507587
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/japplphysiol.00950.2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/61615
dc.description.abstractWe determined the effects of varying daily carbohydrate intake by providing or withholding carbohydrate during daily training on endurance performance, whole body rates of substrate oxidation, and selected mitochondrial enzymes. Sixteen endurance-trained cyclists or triathletes were pair matched and randomly allocated to either a high-carbohydrate group (High group; n = 8) or an energy-matched low-carbohydrate group (Low group; n = 8) for 28 days. Immediately before study commencement and during the final 5 days, subjects undertook a 5-day test block in which they completed an exercise trial consisting of a 100 min of steady-state cycling (100SS) followed by a 7-kJ/kg time trial on two occasions separated by 72 h. In a counterbalanced design, subjects consumed either water (water trial) or a 10% glucose solution (glucose trial) throughout the exercise trial. A muscle biopsy was taken from the vastus lateralis muscle on day 1 of the first test block, and rates of substrate oxidation were determined throughout 100SS. Training induced a marked increase in maximal citrate synthase activity after the intervention in the High group (27 vs. 34 孯l秭1筩n-1, P < 0.001). Tracer-derived estimates of exogenous glucose oxidation during 100SS in the glucose trial increased from 54.6 to 63.6 g (P < 0.01) in the High group with no change in the Low group. Cycling performance improved by ~6% after training. We conclude that altering total daily carbohydrate intake by providing or withholding carbohydrate during daily training in trained athletes results in differences in selected metabolic adaptations to exercise, including the oxidation of exogenous carbohydrate. However, these metabolic changes do not alter the training-induced magnitude of increase in exercise performance.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom126
dc.relation.ispartofpageto134
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Applied Physiology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume109
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode069999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleDaily training with high carbohydrate availability increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance cycling
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the authors for more information.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCox, Amanda J.


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