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dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diegoen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpathonis, Kymen_US
dc.contributor.editorG. Crepaldien_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:33:22Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:33:22Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.issn15940667en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF03324486en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/6168
dc.description.abstractEpidemiological studies of suicide in the elderly indicate that, in the last few decades, there has been a relevant increase in suicide rates in old age in a number of Asian and Latin nations, with an almost parallel decrease in Anglo-Saxon counties. Mental disorders, particularly depression, physical illness, personality traits such as hostility, hopelessness, the inability to verbally express psychological pain and dependency on others, recent life events and losses are all factors that may contribute to suicide in later life. Compared with suicide in other age groups, mors voluntaris in late life is associated with the use of highly lethal methods, less ambivalence and impulsivity, and more determination and intent to die. Accordingly, elderly suicidal individuals are more likely than younger subjects to complete rather than attempt suicide. Some evidence suggests also that the characteristics of elderly individuals who attempt suicide may not overlap with those who complete suicide. Death thoughts and suicidal ideations are relatively rare among mentally healthy elderly adults, and are less predominant in this age bracket. However, whether elderly suicidal behaviour exists along a continuum, progressing in severity from death thoughts and suicidal ideation to suicide attempts and completed suicide, remains unclear. Assisted suicide and euthanasia in the elderly have been associated with the desire to escape chronic physical pain and suffering caused by terminal illness, and to relieve mental anguish and feelings of hopelessness, depression and extreme "tiredness of life." The role of the family and those treating chronically ill members is crucial in the final stages of life, particularly when autonomy and the ability of the elderly individual to make end-of-life decisions are compromised. The main aspects associated with these controversial phenomena, particularly from a transcultural perspective, are reviewed in this article.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEditrice Kurtis s.r.l.en_US
dc.publisher.placeItalyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom99en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto110en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAging Clinical and Experimental Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320000en_US
dc.titleSuicide and euthanisia in late life.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, Australian Institute for Suicide Research & Preventionen_US
gro.date.issued2015-02-03T03:03:53Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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