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dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Glendaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHalford, Graemeen_US
dc.contributor.authorShum, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorMaujean, Annicken_US
dc.contributor.authorChappell, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorP. Birney, Damianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:42:05Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:42:05Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn1362301Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/02699052.2014.888758en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/61960
dc.description.abstractObjective: The research examined whether verbal learning and memory impairment previously observed 1 year after left hemisphere stroke endures over a longer period and whether stroke sufferers compensate for their impairments using working memory. Methodology: Twenty-one persons with left hemisphere lesions; 20 with right hemisphere lesions only and 41 matched controls completed the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), a working memory test (Letter-Number Sequencing, LNS) and the Boston Naming Test (BNT). Results: Persons with left hemisphere damage performed more poorly on HVLT-R than controls. They showed poorer immediate recall, delayed recall, recognition and learning, but intact retention, suggesting an encoding impairment. BNT and LNS scores predicted recall in this group. HVLT-R performance of persons with right hemisphere lesions only was comparable to controls. BNT (not LNS) predicted recall in these groups. Conclusions: Persons with left hemisphere damage relied more on working memory and recruited diverse left hemisphere regions to compensate for their impaired encoding. Implications: Tasks requiring verbal encoding and memory are effortful following left hemisphere stroke. This should be recognized and accommodated.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent232633 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom442en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto447en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBrain Injuryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.titleVerbal learning and memory following strokeen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Informa Healthcare. This is an electronic version of an article published in Brain Injury, Vol. 28(4), 2014, pp. 442-447. Brain Injury is available online at: http://informahealthcare.com with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-08-06T00:11:41Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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