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dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Glenda
dc.contributor.authorHalford, Graeme S
dc.contributor.authorShum, David HK
dc.contributor.authorMaujean, Annick
dc.contributor.authorChappell, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBirney, Damian P
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:42:05Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:42:05Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0269-9052
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/02699052.2014.888758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/61960
dc.description.abstractObjective: The research examined whether verbal learning and memory impairment previously observed 1 year after left hemisphere stroke endures over a longer period and whether stroke sufferers compensate for their impairments using working memory. Methodology: Twenty-one persons with left hemisphere lesions; 20 with right hemisphere lesions only and 41 matched controls completed the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), a working memory test (Letter-Number Sequencing, LNS) and the Boston Naming Test (BNT). Results: Persons with left hemisphere damage performed more poorly on HVLT-R than controls. They showed poorer immediate recall, delayed recall, recognition and learning, but intact retention, suggesting an encoding impairment. BNT and LNS scores predicted recall in this group. HVLT-R performance of persons with right hemisphere lesions only was comparable to controls. BNT (not LNS) predicted recall in these groups. Conclusions: Persons with left hemisphere damage relied more on working memory and recruited diverse left hemisphere regions to compensate for their impaired encoding. Implications: Tasks requiring verbal encoding and memory are effortful following left hemisphere stroke. This should be recognized and accommodated.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent232633 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom442
dc.relation.ispartofpageto447
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBrain Injury
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleVerbal learning and memory following stroke
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Informa Healthcare. This is an electronic version of an article published in Brain Injury, Vol. 28(4), 2014, pp. 442-447. Brain Injury is available online at: http://informahealthcare.com with the open URL of your article.
gro.date.issued2015-08-06T00:11:41Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMaujean, Annick A.
gro.griffith.authorShum, David
gro.griffith.authorAndrews, Glenda
gro.griffith.authorChappell, Mark
gro.griffith.authorHalford, Graeme S.


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