Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrenu, Ekuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHardcastle, Sharnien_US
dc.contributor.authorHuth, Teilahen_US
dc.contributor.authorStaines, Donen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarshall-Gradisnik, Sonyaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-29T12:34:09Z
dc.date.available2017-05-29T12:34:09Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-07T00:11:38Z
dc.identifier.issn1477-7525en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1477-7525-12-64en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/61961
dc.description.abstractBackground: Several diagnostic definitions are available for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) that varies significantly in their symptom criteria. This pilot study was conducted to determine whether simple biological and clinical measures differed between CFS/ME patients meeting the 1994 Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria, the International Consensus Criteria (ICC), as well as healthy controls. Methods: A total of 45 CFS/ME patients and 30 healthy controls from the South East Queensland region of Australia provided a blood sample, reported on their current symptoms, as well as aspects of their physical and social health using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the World Health Organisation Disability Adjustment Schedule 2.0 (WHO DAS 2.0). Differences were examined using independent sample t-testing. Results: Patients fulfilling the ICC definition reported significantly lower scores (p < 0.05) for physical functioning, physical role, bodily pain, and social functioning than those that only fulfilled the 1994 CDC definition. ICC patients reported significantly greater (p < 0.05) disability across all domains of the WHO DAS 2.0. Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest that the ICC identifies a distinct subgroup found within patients complying with the 1994 CDC definition, with more severe impairment to their physical and social functioning.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent163562 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom64-1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto64-7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealth and Quality of Life Outcomesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399en_US
dc.titleA comparison of health status in patients meeting alternative definitions for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0en_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Scienceen_US
gro.description.notepublicPage numbers are not for citation purposes. Instead, this article has the unique article number of 64.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Johnston et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record