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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSonderegger, Robien_US
dc.contributor.authorXenos, Sophiaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:23:23Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:23:23Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.date.modified2007-04-02T05:16:40Z
dc.identifier.issn13591045en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/6197
dc.description.abstractThe primary objectives of this study were: (i) to evaluate the capacity of a well- validated anxiety prevention and emotional resiliency program (FRIENDS) to reduce psychological distress in young culturally diverse migrants of non-English speaking background (NESB), and (ii) to determine whether any change in psychological symptoms and emotional resilience would be maintained over time. Three hundred and twenty-four students differentiated by cultural origin (former- Yugoslavian, Chinese, and mixed-ethnic) and educational level (elementary and high school), were recruited from different Australian states and allocated to either an intervention or wait-list condition. All students completed standardized measures of self-esteem, internalizing symptoms, and future outlook both before and after a 10-week FRIENDS intervention or wait period. One hundred and thirty-nine participants from Queensland were also assessed six months following completion of the FRIENDS program to determine its long-term effects. Consistent with previous trials involving culturally diverse populations, NESB participants who underwent FRIENDS training exhibited significantly greater self- esteem, fewer internalizing symptoms, and a less pessimistic future outlook than wait-list participants at both post- and six months follow-up assessment intervals. This study provides empirical evidence for the utility of the FRIENDS program as a resource for therapists and schools working with young culturally diverse migrant populations.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://ccp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/8/2/241en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom241en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto260en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical Child Psychology & Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380107en_US
dc.titleUsing FRIENDS to combat anxiety and adjustment problems among young migrants to Australia: A national trial.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2003 Sage Publications. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in Clinical Child Psychology & Psychiatry. This journal is available online: http://ccp.sagepub.com/content/vol8/issue2/en_AU
gro.date.issued2003
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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