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dc.contributor.authorGuitart, Daniela A
dc.contributor.authorPickering, Catherine M
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Jason A
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-25T01:07:48Z
dc.date.available2018-07-25T01:07:48Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.modified2014-08-19T04:39:24Z
dc.identifier.issn1353-8292
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.healthplace.2013.12.014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/62450
dc.description.abstractCommunity garden research has focused on social aspects of gardens, neglecting systematic analysis of what food is grown. Yet agrodiversity within community gardens may provide health benefits. Diverse fruit and vegetables provide nutritional benefits, including vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals. This paper reports research that investigated the agro-biodiversity of school-based community gardens in Brisbane and Gold Coast cities, Australia. Common motivations for establishing these gardens were education, health and environmental sustainability. The 23 gardens assessed contained 234 food plants, ranging from 7 to 132 plant types per garden. This included 142 fruits and vegetables. The nutritional diversity of fruits and vegetable plants was examined through a color classification system. All gardens grew fruits and vegetables from at least four food color groups, and 75% of the gardens grew plants from all seven color groups. As places with high agrodiversity, and related nutritional diversity, some school community gardens can provide children with exposure to a healthy range of fruit and vegetables, with potential flow-on health benefits.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom110
dc.relation.ispartofpageto117
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealth & Place
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBuilt Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Geography
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode129999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1604
dc.titleColor me healthy: Food diversity in school community gardens in two rapidly urbanising Australian cities
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPickering, Catherine M.
gro.griffith.authorByrne, Jason A.
gro.griffith.authorGuitart, Daniela


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