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dc.contributor.authorBradlow, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorBolnick, Joel
dc.contributor.authorShearing, Clifford
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:41:41Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:41:41Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2014-08-19T04:43:52Z
dc.identifier.issn0956-2478
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0956247810392272
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/62558
dc.description.abstractThis paper considers why the housing subsidy programme in South Africa has had so little impact on poverty reduction despite its scale and generous funding. It discusses how this was linked to the government's conception of housing, the institutions involved and who controlled funding flows for housing. Most government funding went to contractors to build new units "for the poor"; it was assumed that these would replace homes in informal settlements that the poor developed themselves. Despite statements about the government's commitment to the People's Housing Process (PHP), informal settlements were only seen in negative terms and there was no support for incremental upgrading and very little support for low-income households to build their own homes. Meanwhile, the contractor-built houses were usually too small, of poor quality and in locations far from livelihoods and services. The paper ends with suggestions for how the formal institutions of government can learn to support and work with the poor. The incremental approaches of the poor to their own housing and livelihoods can serve as an alternative first principle for conceiving of the challenge of human settlements policy and practice. Furthermore, funding flows and their associated institutions should support people-centred development and institutionalize systems that make the informed participation of residents of informal settlements a pre-condition for state support.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom267
dc.relation.ispartofpageto275
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironment and Urbanization
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1205
dc.titleHousing, institutions, money: The failures and promise of human settlements policy and practice in South Africa
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorShearing, Clifford D.


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