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dc.contributor.authorArthington, Angela
dc.contributor.authorRolls, Rob
dc.contributor.authorSternberg, David
dc.contributor.authorMackay, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorJames, Cassie
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-17T01:40:14Z
dc.date.available2018-10-17T01:40:14Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.modified2014-09-08T22:11:34Z
dc.identifier.issn02626667en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02626667.2013.844345en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/62758
dc.description.abstractEffective environmental flow management depends on identification of ecologically-relevant flow attributes to maintain or restore flows in the context of other natural and human influences on stream ecosystems. This study in subtropical eastern Australia identified associations of fish with climatic and flow gradients, catchment topography, reach geology, habitat structure and land use across 20 catchments. Land-use patterns and associated stressors accounted for very little variation in fish assemblage structure. Of the 35 fish species analysed, 24 were strongly associated with gradients in mean daily flows and their variability, baseflow, number of zero-flow days and high-flow pulses, magnitude of the 1-year annual return interval flood and the constancy and predictability of monthly flows. The finding that 22 species (benthic and pelagic) were associated with gradients of antecedent low-flow hydrology indicates that these species (or functional trait groups) should be the focus of further analysis to explore hydro-ecological relationships in systems with regulated flow regimes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom594en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto604en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3-4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHydrological Sciences Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume59en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Applications not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFreshwater Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060204en_US
dc.titleFish assemblages in subtropical rivers: low-flow hydrology dominates hydro-ecological relationshipsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Hydrological Sciences Journal on 17 Mar 2014, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/10.1080/02626667.2013.844345en_US
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