Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHayman, DTS
dc.contributor.authorBowen, RA
dc.contributor.authorCryan, PM
dc.contributor.authorMcCracken, GF
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, TJ
dc.contributor.authorPeel, AJ
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, A
dc.contributor.authorWebb, CT
dc.contributor.authorWood, JLN
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:17:27Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:17:27Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1863-1959
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/zph.12000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/63030
dc.description.abstractBats are hosts to a range of zoonotic and potentially zoonotic pathogens. Human activities that increase exposure to bats will likely increase the opportunity for infections to spill over in the future. Ecological drivers of pathogen spillover and emergence in novel hosts, including humans, involve a complex mixture of processes, and understanding these complexities may aid in predicting spillover. In particular, only once the pathogen and host ecologies are known can the impacts of anthropogenic changes be fully appreciated. Cross-disciplinary approaches are required to understand how host and pathogen ecology interact. Bats differ from other sylvatic disease reservoirs because of their unique and diverse lifestyles, including their ability to fly, often highly gregarious social structures, long lifespans and low fecundity rates. We highlight how these traits may affect infection dynamics and how both host and pathogen traits may interact to affect infection dynamics. We identify key questions relating to the ecology of infectious diseases in bats and propose that a combination of field and laboratory studies are needed to create data-driven mechanistic models to elucidate those aspects of bat ecology that are most critical to the dynamics of emerging bat viruses. If commonalities can be found, then predicting the dynamics of newly emerging diseases may be possible. This modelling approach will be particularly important in scenarios when population surveillance data are unavailable and when it is unclear which aspects of host ecology are driving infection dynamics.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent376995 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2
dc.relation.ispartofpageto21
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalZoonoses and Public Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume60
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPopulation Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchVeterinary Epidemiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEpidemiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode070704
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111706
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleEcology of zoonotic infectious diseases in bats: current knowledge and future directions
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
gro.date.issued2015-02-02T04:16:18Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPeel, Alison J.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record