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dc.contributor.authorGarrick, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorPendergast, Donnaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:08:38Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:08:38Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.date.modified2014-09-23T00:15:25Z
dc.identifier.issn0305764Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0305764X.2014.904273en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/63074
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports an analysis of the website of an education authority in the state of Queensland, Australia during the changeover from a state-based curriculum to a national curriculum. The paper's value lies in the capture of an exact moment of change. Kress and van Leeuwen's grammar of visual design is employed to analyse the changes to the Queensland Studies Authority's website from 2009 to 2010. The significant changes to the site show the impact of policy that has been borrowed from the UK and the USA around testing and accountability, and as such has bearing on the international policy environment. The impact of these testing and accountability measures is twofold. First, that regimes of accountability and testing outweigh the significance of changes to curriculum and pedagogy and, second, that this understanding has implications for teacher education and teacher professionalism. We argue that borrowed policy from the international sphere, through a national agenda and then on to a local education authority, has hollowed out and narrowed the provision of education information and assistance available to readers of the site. This is most notable in the shift we observe from informed teacher professionalism through links to professional development available on the site in 2009 to prescription most notably evident in the absence of professional development hyperlinks on the site in 2010. The inference we draw, for example, is that teachers in the state of Queensland are to follow the prescriptions on the web page without access to policy learning through professional development. This has implications for teacher education and teacher professionalism.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom299en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto317en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCambridge Journal of Educationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume44en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Policyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160506en_US
dc.titleThe impact of national agenda on a local education authority's website: a visual semiotic analysisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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