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dc.contributor.authorMozley, CG
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, J
dc.contributor.authorCordingley, L
dc.contributor.authorMolineux, M
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, S
dc.contributor.authorHart, C
dc.contributor.authorStoker, B
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, R
dc.contributor.authorLovegrove, R
dc.contributor.authorCruickshank, A
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-05
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-24T05:00:49Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-01T23:54:34Z
dc.date.available2017-03-01T23:54:34Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.modified2014-09-24T05:00:49Z
dc.identifier.issn1360-7863
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13607860600637810
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/63178
dc.description.abstractThe primary aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that depression severity in care homes for older people would be reduced by an occupational therapy programme. This was a feasibility study for a cluster randomised controlled trial and involved four intervention and four control homes in northern England. In each intervention home a registered occupational therapist worked full-time for one year delivering an individualised programme to participants. Pre- and post-intervention data for the Geriatric Mental State–Depression Scale (primary outcome measure) were obtained for 143 participants. Secondary outcomes included dependency and quality of life. No significant intervention effects were found in any of the quantitative outcome measures, though qualitative interviews showed the intervention was valued by many participants, staff and relatives. Therapist ratings and qualitative interviews suggested that the intervention was beneficial to some participants but no distinctive characteristics were found that might enable prediction of likely benefit on initial assessment. This exploratory study provides no evidence that this intervention produced benefits in terms of depression, dependency or quality of life. Lack of prior power calculations means these are not definitive findings; but numbers were sufficient to perform the required analyses and data did not suggest effects that would have reached statistical significance with a larger sample. This study highlights issues for consideration in providing such services in care homes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom99
dc.relation.ispartofpageto107
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAging and Mental Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Human Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleThe Care Home Activity Project: Does introducing an occupational therapy programme reduce depression in care homes?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codec1x
gro.facultyGriffith Health Faculty
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMolineux, Matthew


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