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dc.contributor.authorGannon, Billy
dc.contributor.authorRosta, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorReeve, Maria
dc.contributor.authorHyde, Melissa K
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Ioni
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:03:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:03:04Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1369-8478
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trf.2013.10.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/63779
dc.description.abstractDrink walking, that is walking in a public place while intoxicated, is associated with increased risk of injury and fatality. Young people and males are especially prone to engaging in this behaviour, yet little is known about the factors associated with individual's decisions to drink walk. The present research explores the role of different normative influences (friendship group norm, parent group norm, university peer group norm) and perceived risk, within an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) framework, in predicting young people's self-reported drink walking intentions. One hundred and eighteen young people (aged 17-25 years) completed a survey including sociodemographic measures and extended TPB measures related to drink walking. Overall the extended TPB explained 72.8% of the variance in young people's intentions to drink walk in the next six months with attitude, perceived behavioural control, friendship group norm, and gender (male) emerging as significant predictors. Males, as compared with females, had higher intentions to drink walk and lower perceptions of risk regarding drink walking. Together, these findings provide a clearer indication of the salient normative influences and gender differences in young pedestrian's decisions to walk while intoxicated. Such findings can be used to inform future interventions designed to reduce injuries and fatalities associated with drink walking.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent183086 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom12
dc.relation.ispartofpageto24
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTransportation research. Part F: Traffic psychology and behaviour
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransportation and Freight Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1507
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleDoes it matter whether friends, parents, or peers drink walk? Identifying which normative influences predict young pedestrian’s decisions to walk while intoxicated
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2015-02-04T04:26:59Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHyde, Melissa K.


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