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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Newellen_US
dc.contributor.authorLalloo, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKroon, Jeroenen_US
dc.contributor.authorFernando, Suranien_US
dc.contributor.authorTut, Ohnmaren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:09:55Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:09:55Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn1834-7819en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/adj.12190en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/63835
dc.description.abstractBackground: Children in remote Indigenous communities in Australia have levels of dental caries much greater than the national average. One such, the Northern Peninsula Area of Far North Queensland (NPA), had an oral health survey conducted in 2004, shortly before the introduction of fluoridated, reticular water. Children were again surveyed in 2012, following five years exposure. Methods: An oral examination was conducted on all consenting children enrolled in schools across the community, using WHO Basic Oral Health Survey methodology. Results: Few teeth had restorations in both surveys. Age-weighted overall caries prevalence and severity declined from 2005 to 2012 by 37.3%. The effect was most marked in younger children, dmft decreasing by approximately 50% for ages 4 - 9 years; at age 6, mean decayed score decreased from 5.20 to 3.43. DMFT levels also decreased by almost half in 6 - 9 year olds. However, significant unmet treatment needs exist at all ages. Conclusions: There has been considerable improvement in child dental health in the NPA over the past 6 - 7 years. In light of continued poor diet and oral hygiene, water fluoridation is the most likely explanation. The cost-effectiveness for this small community remains an issue which, in the current climate of political antagonism to water fluoridation in many quarters, requires continued study.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent98300 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom366en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto371en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Dental Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume59en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDentistry not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110599en_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of water fluoridation in caries reduction in a remote Indigenous community in Far-North Queenslanden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Dentistry and Oral Healthen_US
gro.rights.copyrightAuthor Posting. Copyright 2014 Australian Dental Association. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Australian Dental Association for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Australian Dental Journal, Vol. 59(3), pp. 366-371.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-09-16T05:38:04Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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