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dc.contributor.authorZhou, Mai Geng
dc.contributor.authorWang, Li Jun
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Tao
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yong Hui
dc.contributor.authorLin, Hua Liang
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Yuan
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Jian Peng
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Wei Lin
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ye Wu
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xiao Feng
dc.contributor.authorGu, Xin
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Shannon
dc.contributor.authorChu, Cordia
dc.contributor.authorMa, Wen Jun
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:45:37Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:45:37Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1476-069X
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1476-069X-13-60
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/63935
dc.description.abstractBackground Many studies have investigated heat wave related mortality, but less attention has been given to the health effects of cold spells in the context of global warming. The 2008 cold spell in China provided a unique opportunity to estimate the effects of the 2008 cold spell on mortality in subtropical regions, spatial heterogeneity of the effects, stratification effect and added effects caused by sustained cold days. Methods Thirty-six study communities were selected from 15 provinces in subtropical China. Daily mortality and meteorological data were collected for each community from 2006 to 2010. A distributed lag linear non-linear model (DLNM) with a lag structure of up to 27 days was used to analyze the association between the 2008 cold spell and mortality. Multivariate meta-analyses were used to combine the cold effects across each community. Results The 2008 cold spell increased mortality by 43.8% (95% CI: 34.8%?~?53.4%) compared to non-cold spell days with the highest effects in southern and central China. The effects were more pronounced for respiratory mortality (RESP) than for cardiovascular (CVD) or cerebrovascular mortality (CBD), for females more than for males, and for the elderly aged =75 years old more than for younger people. Overall, 148,279 excess deaths were attributable to the 2008 cold spell. The cold effect was mainly from extreme low temperatures rather than sustained cold days during this 2008 cold spell. Conclusions The 2008 cold spell increased mortality in subtropical China, which was mainly attributable to the low temperature rather than the sustained duration of the cold spell. The cold effects were spatially heterogeneous and modified by individual-specific characteristics such as gender and age.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent1517413 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom60-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto60-13
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode059999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleHealth impact of the 2008 cold spell on mortality in subtropical China: The climate and health impact national assessment study (CHINAs)
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
gro.description.notepublicPage numbers are not for citation purposes. Instead, this article has the unique article number of 60.
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Zhou et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChu, Cordia M.
gro.griffith.authorRutherford, Shannon


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