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dc.contributor.authorFullagar, Simone
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:45:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:45:23Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.07.041
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/63950
dc.description.abstractIn Australia, like other advanced liberal democracies, the adoption of a recovery orientation was hailed as a major leap forward in mental health policy and service provision. We argue that this shift in thinking about the meaning of recovery requires further analysis of the gendered dimension of self-identity and relationships with the social world. In this article we focus on how mid-life women constructed meaning about recovery through their everyday practices of self-care within the gendered context of depression. Findings from our qualitative research with 31 mid-life women identified how the recovery process was complicated by relapses into depression, with many women critically questioning the limitations of biomedical treatment options for a more relational understanding of recovery. Participant stories revealed important tacit knowledge about recovery that emphasised the process of realising and recognising capacities and self-knowledge. We identify two central themes through which women's tacit knowledge of this changing relation to self in recovery is made explicit: the disciplined self of normalised recovery, redefining recovery and depression. The findings point to the need to reconsider how both recovery discourses and gendered expectations can complicate women's experiences of moving through depression. We argue for a different conceptualisation of recovery as a social practice through which women realise opportunities to embody different 'beings and doings'. A gendered understanding of what women themselves identify is important to their well-being, can contribute to more effective recovery oriented policies based on capability rather than deficit.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent215898 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPergamon Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom116
dc.relation.ispartofpageto124
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial Science & Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume117
dc.relation.urihttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/DP0556131
dc.relation.grantIDDP0556131
dc.relation.fundersARC
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Human Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160899
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode16
dc.titleSocial recovery and the move beyond deficit models of depression: A feminist analysis of mid-life women's self-care practices
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2015-02-04T04:26:27Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorO'Brien, Wendy L.
gro.griffith.authorFullagar, Simone P.


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