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dc.contributor.authorStanisic, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorCutts, Julia
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, E
dc.contributor.authorJ. I. Fowkes, Freya
dc.contributor.authorRosanas-Urgell, Anna
dc.contributor.authorSiba, Peter
dc.contributor.authorLaman, Moses
dc.contributor.authorM. E. Davis, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorManning, Laurens
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Ivo
dc.contributor.authorSchofield, Louis
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-02T22:00:48Z
dc.date.available2018-08-02T22:00:48Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn00221899
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiu083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/64128
dc.description.abstractBackground. Severe malaria (SM) is associated with high levels of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 1 (IL-1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). The role of chemokines is less clear, as is their cellular source. Methods. In a case-control study of children with SM (n = 200), uncomplicated malaria (UM) (n = 153) and healthy community controls (HC) (n = 162) in Papua, New Guinea, we measured cytokine/chemokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with live Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cells (pRBC). Cellular sources were determined. Associations between immunological endpoints and clinical/parasitological variables were tested. Results. Compared to HC and UM, children with SM produced significantly higher IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1߭ and MCP-2. TNF and MIP-1a were significantly higher in the SM compared to the UM group. IL-10, IL-6, MIP-1a, MIP-1߬ and MCP-2 were associated with increased odds of SM. SM syndromes were associated with distinct cytokine/chemokine response profiles compared to UM cases. TNF, MIP-1߬ and MIP-1a were produced predominantly by monocytes and ?d T cells, and IL-10 by CD4+ T cells. Conclusions. Early/innate PBMC responses to pRBC in vitro are informative as to cytokines/chemokines associated with SM. Predominant cellular sources are monocytes and ?d T cells. Monocyte-derived chemokines support a role for monocyte infiltrates in the etiology of SM.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom295
dc.relation.ispartofpageto305
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
dc.relation.ispartofvolume210
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCellular Immunology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110704
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleγδ T cells and CD14+ Monocytes Are Predominant Cellular Sources of Cytokines and Chemokines Associated With Severe Malaria
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyOffice of the Snr Dep Vice Chancellor, Institute for Glycomics
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorStanisic, Danielle


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