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dc.contributor.authorBonell, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.authorSohaindo, Anniken_US
dc.contributor.authorWells, Heleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKee, Martinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:21:20Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:21:20Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143005Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2011.137539en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/64129
dc.description.abstractBackground School systems are increasingly typified by diversity of provision, parental choice and publication of performance data. Schools shape their students' lifestyles and health, but the effects of 'marketisation' are under-researched. The authors use qualitative data to develop a logic model regarding such effects. Methods Case studies in seven English secondary schools, interviews with 103 students and 39 staff. Results 'Parental choice' was associated with dispersal of students' friendship groups on transition to secondary school, reduced social support and emotional harms. 'Choice' meant some schools were regarded as 'dumping grounds' for socially disadvantaged students, creating potentially violent environments where students engaged in risk behaviours such as substance use to facilitate protective bonds with peers. Schools focused strongly on academic attainment, reflecting external pressures from the school inspectorate and performance league tables. Some schools sought to improve their league table position by targeting resources on 'key marginal' students on the threshold of passing five exams, the key metric. Less-academic students commonly became disengaged, engaging in various health risk behaviours as alternative status markers. The exam-focused environment aroused anxiety among high and low attainers, some using substances as self-medication. Schools also de-prioritised health education and sport in this performance-driven context. Conclusion Our logic model aims to guide further research on how marketisation might affect young people health behaviours.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent703333 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome24-1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe24-4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume66en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crimeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICESen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111700en_US
dc.titleHow market-oriented education policies might influence young people’s health: development of a logic model from qualitative case studies in English secondary schoolsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2012. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2014-11-17T21:55:14Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWells, Helene A.


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