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dc.contributor.authorL. Halson, Shona
dc.contributor.authorBartram, Jason
dc.contributor.authorWest, Nic
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorArgus, Christos K.
dc.contributor.authorW. Driller, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorSargent, Charli
dc.contributor.authorLastella, Michele
dc.contributor.authorG. Hopkins, Will
dc.contributor.authorT. Martin, David
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-04T00:19:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-04T00:19:19Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1530-0315
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/MSS.0000000000000268
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65034
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Cold water immersion (CWI) may be beneficial for acute recovery from exercise, but it may impair long-term performance by attenuating the stimuli responsible for adaptation to training. We compared effects of CWI and passive rest on cycling performance during a simulated cycling grand tour. Methods: Thirty-four male endurance-trained competitive cyclists were randomized to CWI for four times per week for 15 min at 15àor control (passive recovery) groups for 7 d of baseline training, 21 d of intensified training, and an 11-d taper. Criteria for completion of training and testing were satisfied by 10 cyclists in the CWI group (maximal aerobic power, 5.13 ᠰ.21 W竧-1; mean ᠓D) and 11 in the control group (5.01 ᠰ.41 W竧-1). Each week, cyclists completed a high-intensity interval cycling test and two 4-min bouts separated by 30 min. CWI was performed four times per week for 15 min at 15î Results: Between baseline and taper, cyclists in the CWI group had an unclear change in overall 4-min power relative to control (2.7% ᠵ.7%), although mean power in the second effort relative to the first was likely higher for the CWI group relative to control (3.0% ᠳ.8%). The change in 1-s maximum mean sprint power in the CWI group was likely beneficial compared with control (4.4% ᠴ.2%). Differences between groups for the 10-min time trial were unclear (-0.4% ᠴ.3%). Conclusion: Although some effects of CWI on performance were unclear, data from this study do not support recent speculation that CWI is detrimental to performance after increased training load in competitive cyclists.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1631
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1639
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
dc.relation.ispartofvolume46
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleDoes Hydrotherapy Help or Hinder Adaptation to Training in Competitive Cyclists?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 LWW. This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, ugust 2014 - Volume 46 - Issue 8 - p 1631–1639. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWest, Nic P.


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