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dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Matthew M
dc.contributor.authorHall, Susan
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Gary
dc.contributor.authorSabapathy, Surendran
dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-23T05:10:04Z
dc.date.available2018-07-23T05:10:04Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn8750-7587
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/japplphysiol.00570.2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65120
dc.description.abstractCombining an exercise and nutritional intervention is arguably the optimal method of creating energy imbalance for weight loss. This study sought to determine whether combining exercise and caffeine supplementation was more effective for promoting acute energy deficits and manipulations to substrate metabolism than exercise alone. Fourteen recreationally active participants (mean ± SD body mass index: 22.7 ± 2.6 kg/m2) completed a resting control trial (CON), a placebo exercise trial (EX), and a caffeine exercise trial (EX+CAF, 2 × 3 mg/kg of caffeine 90 min before and 30 min after exercise) in a randomized, double-blinded design. Trials were 4 h in duration with 1 h of rest, 1 h of cycling at ∼65% power at maximum O2 consumption or rest, and a 2-h recovery. Gas exchange, appetite perceptions, and blood samples were obtained periodically. Two hours after exercise, participants were offered an ad libitum test meal where energy and macronutrient intake were recorded. EX+CAF resulted in significantly greater energy expenditure and fat oxidation compared with EX (+250 kJ; +10.4 g) and CON (+3,126 kJ; +29.7 g) (P < 0.05). A trend for reduced energy and fat intake compared with CON (−718 kJ; −8 g) (P = 0.055) was observed. Consequently, EX+CAF created a greater energy deficit (P < 0.05). Caffeine also led to exercise being perceived as less difficult and more enjoyable (P < 0.05). Combining caffeine with exercise creates a greater acute energy deficit, and the implications of this protocol for weight loss or maintenance over longer periods of time in overweight/obese populations should be further investigated.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society
dc.publisher.placeMaryland
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom745
dc.relation.ispartofpageto754
dc.relation.ispartofissue7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Applied Physiology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume117
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical and Sports Nutrition
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111101
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleCaffeine consumption around an exercise bout: effects on energy expenditure, energy intake, and exercise enjoyment
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Health
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 American Physiological Society . This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSabapathy, Surendran
gro.griffith.authorHall, Susan
gro.griffith.authorDesbrow, Ben
gro.griffith.authorGrant, Gary D.
gro.griffith.authorSchubert, Matt
gro.griffith.authorLeveritt, Michael


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