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dc.contributor.authorWortley, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorHomel, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.editorKaren Gillen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:10:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:10:23Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.modified2010-03-23T07:24:24Z
dc.identifier.issn14603780en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/palgrave.cpcs.8140111en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/6516
dc.description.abstractThis study examines factors that encourage or discourage joyriding from three different but compatible perspectives: deterrence theory, situational prevention and neutralisation theory. Participants were 228 high school students from grades 10, 11 and 12 who responded to a questionnaire in which they ranked the perceived effectiveness of various deterrents to joyriding. Criminal sanctions involving serious consequences, such as being convicted and sentenced for the offence, were seen to be potentially the most effective legal deterrents. Similarly, informal sanctions involving serious potential outcomes such as injury and loss of life were seen to be the most effective non-legal deterrents. Situational measures that were considered the most discouraging were those that increased the perceived effort and increased the perceived risk of stealing a car. The most effective neutralisations for joyriding (those most likely to facilitate joyriding) were those contrasting joyriding with the crime of those in power and those shifting the blame to the victim for allowing the car to be stolen; the least effective neutralisations (those least likely to facilitate joyriding) involved denying that joyriding hurt anyone or that joyriding is a crime. As predicted, males and self-identified joyriders generally rated the deterrents to joyriding as less effective than did females and non-joyriders. It is argued that prevention approaches need to incorporate a broad, integrated picture of the perceived costs and benefits of joyriding.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent82577 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPerpetuity Press Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom11en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto25en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCrime Prevention and Community Safety: an International Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390401en_US
dc.titlePerceptions of physical, psychological, social and legal deterrents to joyridingen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2002 Palgrave Macmillan. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Crime Prevention and Community Safety. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/cpcs/index.htmlen_AU
gro.date.issued2002
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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