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dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, J
dc.contributor.authorPorter, LE
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T01:30:58Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T01:30:58Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1756-0616
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijlcj.2014.07.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65209
dc.description.abstractAustralia has seen an increase in the abuse of prescription drugs, including obtaining them through prescription fraud. As the gate-keepers to medications, pharmacists have the opportunity to assess the veracity of prescriptions and those presenting them. The present study investigated how pharmacists detect deception in the context of prescription fraud, and whether their experience affects their levels of suspicion compared with non-experienced laypersons. An online survey was completed by 43 pharmacists and 110 laypersons. Pharmacists reported using a variety of methods to detect fraudulent prescriptions. When faced with indicators of drug use, as well as both reliable and unreliable indicators of deception (as determined from the literature), pharmacists were generally more suspicious than laypersons of all and more suspicious than laypersons of a hypothetical person displaying 'true' indicators of deception. However, both groups were misled by unreliable deception cues, and laypersons actually demonstrated more knowledge of deception cues than pharmacists.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent675577 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom50
dc.relation.ispartofpageto67
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Law, Crime and Justice
dc.relation.ispartofvolume43
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crime
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminological Theories
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160204
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titlePrescription fraud: A comparison of pharmacists' and laypersons' perceptions of suspicious prescription presentation behaviour
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2015-02-09T02:01:05Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRandell, Jade N.
gro.griffith.authorPorter, Louise E.


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