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dc.contributor.authorGraham, William M
dc.contributor.authorGelcich, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Kelly L
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M
dc.contributor.authorBrotz, Lucas
dc.contributor.authorPurcell, Jennifer E
dc.contributor.authorMadin, Laurence P
dc.contributor.authorMianzan, Hermes
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Kelly R
dc.contributor.authorUye, Shin-ichi
dc.contributor.authorPitt, Kylie A
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Cathy H
dc.contributor.authorBogeberg, Molly
dc.contributor.authorBrodeur, Richard D
dc.contributor.authorCondon, Rolert H
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:14:06Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:14:06Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1540-9295
dc.identifier.doi10.1890/130298
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65212
dc.description.abstractJellyfish are usually perceived as harmful to humans and are seen as "pests". This negative perception has hindered knowledge regarding their value in terms of ecosystem services. As humans increasingly modify and interact with coastal ecosystems, it is important to evaluate the benefits and costs of jellyfish, given that jellyfish bloom size, frequency, duration, and extent are apparently increasing in some regions of the world. Here we explore those benefits and costs as categorized by regulating, supporting, cultural, and provisioning ecosystem services. A geographical perspective of human vulnerability to jellyfish over four categories of human well-being (health care, food, energy, and freshwater production) is also discussed in the context of thresholds and trade-offs to enable social adaptation. Whereas beneficial services provided by jellyfish likely scale linearly with biomass (perhaps peaking at a saturation point), non-linear thresholds exist for negative impacts to ecosystem services. We suggest that costly adaptive strategies will outpace the beneficial services if jellyfish populations continue to increase in the future.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent273140 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherEcological Society of America
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom515
dc.relation.ispartofpageto523
dc.relation.ispartofissue9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Ecology and the Environment
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060205
dc.titleLinking human well-being and jellyfish: ecosystem services, impacts and societal responses
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Ecological Society of America. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPitt, Kylie A.


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