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dc.contributor.authorBoyde, M
dc.contributor.authorGrenfell, K
dc.contributor.authorBrown, R
dc.contributor.authorBannear, S
dc.contributor.authorLollback, N
dc.contributor.authorWitt, J
dc.contributor.authorJiggins, L
dc.contributor.authorAitken, L
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:22:28Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:22:28Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1036-7314
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aucc.2014.05.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65382
dc.description.abstractBackground Education for hospitalised patients is an important aspect of care for people who have an acute cardiovascular event. Objective To investigate the cardiovascular risk factor behaviours of patients together with their acute coronary syndrome (ACS) knowledge, attitudes and beliefs following admission to hospital for an acute myocardial infarction. Methods Patients diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction participated in an observational study. Patients completed a questionnaire consisting of cardiovascular risk factor behaviour questions and the ACS Response Index prior to discharge and at follow-up 10 weeks later. Results Of the 135 participants enrolled, 114 (84%) completed follow-up, 70% were males; mean age was 63 (ᱱ.6) years. The median length of hospital stay was 3 days (IQR 1) and the time to follow-up after discharge was 10 weeks. Self-reported risk factor behaviours improved significantly for diet (p < 0.001) and smoking cessation (p = 0.023) following discharge. At discharge 39% of patients had inadequate knowledge of ACS symptoms. The ACS Response Index improved significantly after discharge for attitudes (p = 0.004) and beliefs (p = 0.008). Despite 85% of patients indicating they would attend cardiac rehabilitation only 30% had commenced a programme at follow-up. Conclusion Patients reported implementing a number of healthy lifestyle changes following discharge including smoking cessation and healthy eating. Attitudes and beliefs regarding ACS showed a significant improvement following discharge. More than one third of patients had inadequate knowledge at discharge, suggesting current education practices may not be meeting the needs of patients with a myocardial infarction.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent132122 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Critical Care
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.titleWhat have our patients learnt after being hospitalised for an acute myocardial infarction?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 ACCCN. Published by Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2015-01-30T00:43:39Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorAitken, Leanne M.


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