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dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Ben
dc.contributor.authorJansen, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Abby
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, Michael D
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:25:27Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:25:27Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1715-5312
dc.identifier.doi10.1139/apnm-2014-0174
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65385
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to compare the rehydration potential of a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage with several varieties of milk following exercise-induced fluid losses. Fifteen male participants (age 24.9 ᠵ.5 years, height 179.3 ᠴ.9 cm, body mass 75.8 ᠶ.6 kg (mean ᠓D)) lost 2.0% ᠰ.2% body mass through intermittent cycling before consuming a different beverage on 4 separate occasions. Drinks included cow's milk (286 kJ籰0 mL-1), soy milk (273 kJ籰0 mL-1), a milk-based liquid meal supplement (Sustagen Sport (Nestle); 417 kJ籰0 mL-1), and a sports drink (Powerade (Coca Cola Ltd); 129 kJ籰0 mL-1). Beverages were consumed over 1 h in volumes equivalent to 150% of body mass loss. Body mass, blood and urine samples, and measures of gastrointestinal tolerance were obtained before and hourly for 4 h after beverage consumption. Net body mass at the conclusion of each trial was significantly less with Powerade (-1.37 ᠰ.3 kg) than with cow's milk (-0.92 ᠰ.48 kg), soy milk (-0.78 ᠰ.37 kg), and Sustagen Sport (-0.48 ᠰ.39 kg). Net body mass was also significantly greater for Sustagen Sport compared with cow's milk trials, but not soy milk. Upon completion of trials, the percentage of beverage retained was Sustagen Sport 65.1% ᠱ4.7%, soy milk 46.9% ᠱ9.9%, cow's milk 40.0% ᠲ4.9%, and Powerade 16.6% ᠱ6.5%. Changes in plasma volume and electrolytes were unaffected by drink treatment. Subjective ratings of bloating and fullness were higher during all milk trials compared with Powerade whereas ratings of overall thirst were not different between beverages. Milk-based drinks are more effective rehydration options compared with traditional sports drinks. The additional energy, protein, and sodium in a milk-based liquid meal supplement facilitate superior fluid recovery following exercise.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNRC Research Press
dc.publisher.placeCanada
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1366
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1372
dc.relation.ispartofissue12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical and Sports Nutrition
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111101
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleComparing the rehydration potential of different milk based drinks to a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Health
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 NRC Research Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorIrwin, Chris G.
gro.griffith.authorDesbrow, Ben
gro.griffith.authorLeveritt, Michael
gro.griffith.authorBarrett, Abby
gro.griffith.authorJansen, Sarah


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