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dc.contributor.authorDaly, Kathleen
dc.contributor.editorRichard Sparks
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:23:11Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:23:11Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.date.modified2007-05-22T22:15:45Z
dc.identifier.issn14624745
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/6547
dc.description.abstractAdvocates' claims about restorative justice contain four myths: (1) restorative justice is the opposite of retributive justice; (2) restorative justice uses indigenous justice practices and was the dominant form of pre-modern justice; (3) restorative justice is a 'care' (or feminine) response to crime in comparison to a 'justice' (or masculine) response; and (4) restorative justice can be expected to produce major changes in people. Drawing from research on conferencing in Australia and New Zealand, I show that the real story of restorative justice differs greatly from advocates' mythical true story. Despite what advocates say, there are connections between retribution and restoration (or reparation), restorative justice should not be considered a pre-modern and feminine justice, strong stories of repair and goodwill are uncommon, and the raw material for restorativeness between victims and offenders may be in short supply. Following Engel, myth refers to a true story; its truth deals with 'origins, with birth, with beginnings... with how something began to be' (1993: 791-2, emphasis in original). Origin stories, in turn, 'encode a set of oppositions' (1993: 822) such that when telling a true story, speakers transcend adversity. By comparing advocates' true story of restorative justice with the real story, I offer a critical and sympathetic reading of advocates' efforts to move the idea forward. I end by reflecting on whether the political future of restorative justice is better secured by telling the mythical true story or the real story.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent134204 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.publisher.placeLondon, UK
dc.publisher.urihttp://pun.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/4/1/55
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom55
dc.relation.ispartofpageto79
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPunishment and Society: the international journal of penology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleRestorative Justice: The Real Story
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.rights.copyright© 2002 Sage Publications. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in Punishment and Society. This journal is available online: http://pun.sagepub.com/content/vol4/issue1/
gro.date.issued2002
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDaly, Kathleen


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