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dc.contributor.authorJimenez-Soto, Eliana
dc.contributor.authorHodge, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Kim-Huong
dc.contributor.authorDettrick, Zoe
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Alan D
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:22:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:22:04Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0106234
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65523
dc.description.abstractBackground Over recent years there has been a strong movement towards the improvement of vital statistics and other types of health data that inform evidence-based policies. Collecting such data is not cost free. To date there is no systematic framework to guide investment decisions on methods of data collection for vital statistics or health information in general. We developed a framework to systematically assess the comparative costs and outcomes/benefits of the various data methods for collecting vital statistics. Methodology The proposed framework is four-pronged and utilises two major economic approaches to systematically assess the available data collection methods: cost-effectiveness analysis and efficiency analysis. We built a stylised example of a hypothetical low-income country to perform a simulation exercise in order to illustrate an application of the framework. Findings Using simulated data, the results from the stylised example show that the rankings of the data collection methods are not affected by the use of either cost-effectiveness or efficiency analysis. However, the rankings are affected by how quantities are measured. Conclusion There have been several calls for global improvements in collecting useable data, including vital statistics, from health information systems to inform public health policies. Ours is the first study that proposes a systematic framework to assist countries undertake an economic evaluation of DCMs. Despite numerous challenges, we demonstrate that a systematic assessment of outputs and costs of DCMs is not only necessary, but also feasible. The proposed framework is general enough to be easily extended to other areas of health information.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent395314 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome106234-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe106234-12
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPloS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.titleA framework for the economic analysis of data collection methods for vital statistics
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://www.plos.org/journals/license.html
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Jimenez-Soto et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CCAL. (http://www.plos.org/journals/license.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorNguyen, Kim-Huong


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