Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDennison, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorM. Thomson, Donalden_US
dc.contributor.editorRichard L. Wieneren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:57:48Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:57:48Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-27T07:16:03Z
dc.identifier.issn01477307en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1020256022568en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/6555
dc.description.abstractOne method of distinguishing stalking from law-abiding behavior is to determine whether the accused intended to cause fear or harm to the target. However, this distinction may not capture community concerns regarding intrusive or harassing behavior. The present research examines the effect of intent, persistence, relationship, and consequences on community perceptions of stalking. Responses of 1,080 members of the community to a series of scenarios indicated that the presence of explicit evidence of intent was not the only way stalking behavior was identified. Behavior was also identified as stalking as a greater degree of persistence was depicted. Females more often than males perceived the behavior as stalking and inferred intent to cause fear or harm. Most participants who identified the behavior as stalking also indicated that it should be illegal. These results may assist in guiding ongoing debates over appropriate stalking legislation and strategies to reduce the incidence of stalking, as well as indicating whether education regarding stalking laws is required.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherKluwer Academic/Plenum Publishersen_US
dc.publisher.placeThe Nethetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom543en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto561en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLaw and Human Behavioren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode380199en_US
dc.titleIdentifying stalking: the relevance of intent in commonsense reasoning.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.date.issued2002
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record