Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStewart, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWaterson, Elissaen_US
dc.contributor.editorN/Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:57:49Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:57:49Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.issn0817-8542en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/6556
dc.description.abstractFocusing on the 41,700 children born in Queensland in 1983, this study finds that about 10% of these children came into contact with the Department of Families by the time they were 17 years old because of a child protection matter, while about 5% of those in the cohort had a court appearance for a proven offence. The study examines 11 predictive factors for youth offending, and finds that children who suffer maltreatment are more likely to offend. Predictor variables studied include sex of child, Indigenous status, age at final maltreatment incident, number of notifications, type of maltreatment (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse and neglect), and out of home placement. The study finds that physical abuse and neglect are significant predictive factors for youth offending, but sexual and emotional abuse are not. Maltreated Indigenous children were also found to be four times more likely to offend than maltreated non Indigenous children.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent289505 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Institute of Criminologyen_US
dc.publisher.placeCanberra, ACTen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/241-260/tandi241.aspxen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTrends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume241en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390401en_US
dc.titlePathways from child maltreatment to juvenile offendingen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2002 Australian Institute of Criminology. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-01-23T05:24:59Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record