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dc.contributor.authorTacon, Paul SC
dc.contributor.authorTan, Noel Hidalgo
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Sue
dc.contributor.authorJi, Xueping
dc.contributor.authorGang, Li
dc.contributor.authorCurnoe, Darren
dc.contributor.authorBulbeck, David
dc.contributor.authorHakim, Budianto
dc.contributor.authorSumantri, Iwan
dc.contributor.authorThan, Heng
dc.contributor.authorSokrithy, Im
dc.contributor.authorChia, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorKhun-Neay, Khuon
dc.contributor.authorKong, Soeung
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-18T02:39:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-18T02:39:03Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0003-598X
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0003598X00115315
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/65627
dc.description.abstractThe rock art of Southeast Asia has been less thoroughly studied than that of Europe or Australia, and it has generally been considered to be more recent in origin. New dating evidence from Mainland and Island Southeast Asia, however, demonstrates that the earliest motifs (hand stencils and naturalistic animals) are of late Pleistocene age and as early as those of Europe. The similar form of the earliest painted motifs in Europe, Africa and Southeast Asia suggests that they are the product of a shared underlying behaviour, but the difference in context (rockshelters) indicates that experiences in deep caves cannot have been their inspiration.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1050
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1064
dc.relation.ispartofissue342
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAntiquity
dc.relation.ispartofvolume88
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology of Asia, Africa and the Americas
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLinguistics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode210103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2004
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2101
dc.titleThe global implications of the early surviving rock art of greater Southeast Asia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
gro.date.issued2015-04-20T00:08:43Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorTacon, Paul S.


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