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dc.contributor.authorXiao, Jianpeng
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Ji
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yonghui
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Tao
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Shannon
dc.contributor.authorLin, Hualiang
dc.contributor.authorQian, Zhengmin
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Cunrui
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Yuan
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Weilin
dc.contributor.authorChu, Cordia
dc.contributor.authorMa, Wenjun
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:26:07Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:26:07Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0020-7128
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00484-014-0848-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/66327
dc.description.abstractAlthough several studies have documented that latitude might be an effect modifier of the association between temperature and mortality, little is known about how much latitude modifies the temperature-mortality relationship. In this study, we examined this research question using a distributed lag non-linear model and meta-regression analysis based on data from 13 large cities of eastern US from the US National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study. We found that cold effects lasted about 1 month while hot effects were acute and short-term. Meta-regression analysis showed that latitude modified both the cold and hot effects with statistical significance. The cold effect decreased with the latitude increment, with -0.11 % change of mortality effect for 1ࠩncrement, while the hot effect increased with the latitude increment, with 0.18 % change of mortality effect for 1ࠩncrement. This finding indicates the importance of latitude on temperature-related mortality risk, which is helpful for city to develop localized effective adaptation strategy in the context of climate change.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Biometeorology
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAtmospheric Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Physical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAtmospheric Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode029999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode040199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0401
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleHow much does latitude modify temperature–mortality relationship in 13 eastern US cities?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorChu, Cordia M.
gro.griffith.authorRutherford, Shannon
gro.griffith.authorHuang, Cunrui


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