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dc.contributor.authorCrowley, J
dc.contributor.authorBall, L
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, MD
dc.contributor.authorArroll, B
dc.contributor.authorHan, DY
dc.contributor.authorWall, C
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:28:17Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:28:17Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1172-6164
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/66386
dc.description.abstractAim: This study assessed the impact of a medical undergraduate course which contained nutrition content on medical students' self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices. Method: Two hundred and thirty nine medical students enrolled in a 12-week nutrition-related course at the University of Auckland were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire before and after the course with their before and after course responses linked by student identification numbers. The questionnaires were adapted from a previous evaluation of a Preventive Medicine and Nutrition course and measured students' self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices. These responses were compared to a control group of 44 undergraduate biomedical science students. Results: Sixty one medical students completed both questionnaires (25.5%). At baseline, medical students described their eating habits differently from non-medical students (p=0.0261) and reported a higher level of physical activity to the control students (P= 0.0139). Post-course, medical students reported a higher frequency of wholegrain food intake (P=0.0229) and lower levels of physical activity than the controls (P=0.0342). Also post course, medical students felt less comfortable making nutrition recommendations to family or friends (P=0.008). Most medical students (63.9%) perceived that they were more aware of their own dietary choices, and some (15.3%) reported they were more likely to counsel patients on lifestyle behaviour. Conclusions: Students can increase awareness of their own nutrition behaviour after undertaking a course that includes nutrition in the initial phase of their medical degree. Further investigation of how medical students' confidence to provide nutrition advice evolves throughout their training and in future practice is required.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent155182 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoyal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealand
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.publish.csiro.au/HC/HC14101
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom101
dc.relation.ispartofpageto107
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Primary Health Care
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and dietetics not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321099
dc.titleImpact of an undergraduate course on medical students' self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counseling practices
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBall, Lauren E.


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