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dc.contributor.authorDale, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorDale, Patriciaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T14:21:19Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T14:21:19Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-28T06:58:10Z
dc.identifier.issn1585-8553en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1556/ComEc.3.2002.1.3en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/6714
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we examine the impact of runnelling on the vegetation of a salt marsh. Runnelling is a form of habitat modification used for mosquito control in Australia. Defining the states of the system through unsupervised clustering of vegetation records using the minimum message length principle, 11 states (or classes) were identified. The runnelled sites have a greater diversity of states present than the unrunnelled ones. The states at each time for each site were then used to develop transition matrices. From these, two different pathways were identified, indicating the patterns of change. The method of showing changes relied on pictures that represent average species size and density. Both the two main pathways of change started with the dominant grass (Sporobolus). One led to a reduction in Sporobolous and ended in bare ground; the other included changes involving variation in the size and density of a mix of Sporobolus and Sarcocornia. The effects can be interpreted in terms of the increased access of seawater to the marsh resulting in an extension of the lower marsh. We note, however, that this methodology does not distinguish between changes of state within a single process and changes associated with a change in the actual processes operating.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAkademiai Kiadoen_US
dc.publisher.placeHungaryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom19en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto29en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCommunity Ecologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode270799en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode300899en_US
dc.titleOptimal classification to describe environmental change: pictures from the exposition.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.date.issued2002
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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