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dc.contributor.authorBallantyne, Mark
dc.contributor.authorGudes, Ori
dc.contributor.authorPickering, Catherine Marina
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-22T01:25:10Z
dc.date.available2019-01-22T01:25:10Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0169-2046
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.landurbplan.2014.07.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/67230
dc.description.abstractRemnant urban forests are often popular sites for recreational activities such as hiking, biking and motorised recreation. This can result in the formation of extensive trail networks, fragmenting vegetation into patches separated by modified edge effects and ultimately contributing to the degradation of the ecosystem as a whole. Here we use a GIS approach to assess the extent and diversity of trail-based fragmentation across 17 remnants of endangered urban forest (total area 829 ha, Tall Open Blackbutt Forest) in southeast Queensland, Australia. Fourteen different trail types totalling 46.1 km were mapped with informal biking and hiking trails the most common (57%, 26.5 km). More than 47 ha (5.7%) of forest have been lost to trails and their edge effect, nearly equal to the area recently cleared for urban development. The degree of fragmentation in some remnants was in the same order of magnitude as found for some of the most popular nature-based recreation sites in the world. In localised areas, the fragmentation was particularly severe as a result of wide trails used by motorised recreation, but these trails were generally uncommon across the landscape (5%). Spatial regression revealed that the number of access points per remnant was positively correlated with the degree of fragmentation. We encourage more landscape-scale research into trail-based fragmentation due to its capacity to impact extensive areas of endangered ecosystems. Management should seek to minimise the creation of informal trails by hardening popular routes, instigating stakeholder collaboration and centralising visitor flow.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom112
dc.relation.ispartofpageto124
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLandscape and Urban Planning
dc.relation.ispartofvolume130
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial Work not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEngineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBuilt Environment and Design
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode09
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode12
dc.titleRecreational trails are an important cause of fragmentation in endangered urban forests: A case-study from Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Environmental Futures Research Institute
gro.rights.copyright© 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBallantyne, Mark
gro.griffith.authorPickering, Catherine M.


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