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dc.contributor.authorZheng, Junqiang
dc.contributor.authorXu, Zhihong
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yuzhe
dc.contributor.authorDong, Haibo
dc.contributor.authorChen, Chengrong
dc.contributor.authorHan, Shijie
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:31:31Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:31:31Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0038-0717
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.soilbio.2014.07.023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/67516
dc.description.abstractTo examine the potential impact of plant species richness on ecosystems, we studied non-additive effects of different plant litters on the biodegradation rate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) when mixing plant leaf-derived DOM derived from different plant species. A full factorial biodegradation experiment (31 possible singular and multiple combinations of five litter type-derived DOM sources) was conducted using plant litters from the five most abundant plant species in a subtropical watershed ecosystem, from which dissolved organic carbon (DOC) disappearance was measured. Loss of DOC over time was considered biodegradable DOC. We tested whether DOM diversity, measured as source species richness and composition, would affect biodegradation rates. Overall, we found significant non-additive (synergistic) effects of DOM diversity on biodegradation rates of DOM, which were explained both by plant species richness and composition. Across all treatments, a significantly higher biodegradation rate was correlated with the presence of DOM from higher nitrogen (N) containing plant litters; conversely, the presence of lower N decreased these rates. The N content and chemical characteristic of DOM might influence the magnitude of the synergistic effect. Our results suggest that loss of plant litter species diversity would not affect DOC biodegradation rate, provided that at least two species are conserved. However, the variability in DOC biodegradation rate across the treatments decreased with increased DOM diversity at three incubation time points. Our results also indicate that in an ecosystem with low plant biodiversity, loss of key species such as Lophostemon confertus could reduce the synergistic effects on DOC biodegradation rate.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPergamon Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom160
dc.relation.ispartofpageto169
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSoil Biology & Biochemistry
dc.relation.ispartofvolume78
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSoil Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.titleNon-additive effects of mixing different sources of dissolved organic matter on its biodegradation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorXu, Zhihong
gro.griffith.authorChen, Chengrong
gro.griffith.authorWang, Yuzhe
gro.griffith.authorZheng, Junqiang
gro.griffith.authorDong, Haibo


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