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dc.contributor.authorAlperin, Anandi
dc.contributor.authorHornsey, Matthew J
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Lydia E
dc.contributor.authorDiedrichs, Phillippa C
dc.contributor.authorBarlow, Fiona Kate
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T12:01:10Z
dc.date.available2017-11-27T12:01:10Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.10.051
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/67537
dc.description.abstractThis paper is the first to apply the contact hypothesis, a social psychological theory of prejudice reduction, to the field of weight bias. It aims to investigate whether contact with overweight people is associated with the extent to which people report weight bias, as well as vigilance around their own bodies. In 2013 we recruited 1176 American participants to complete surveys regarding prejudice toward overweight people, as well as a suite of measures capturing people's relationships with their own weight (fat talk, drive for thinness, and body-checking behavior). Positive contact with overweight people predicted decreased prejudice, regardless of whether participants were overweight (p < .001) or not (p 젮003). However, negative contact was a stronger predictor of increased prejudice (p < .001 for both samples). For non-overweight participants, any contact with overweight people (whether positive or negative) predicted increased body-checking behaviors (positive-p 젮002, negative-p < .001) and fat talk (positive-p 젮047, negative-p < .001), and negative contact predicted increased drive for thinness (p < .001). However, for those who were overweight a different picture emerged. While negative contact predicted increased body-checking behaviors (p < .001) and fat talk (p < .001), positive contact was protective, predicting decreased drive for thinness (p 젮001) and body-checking behaviors (p < .001). This paper demonstrates that the interactions we have with overweight people are inherently tied to both our attitudes towards them and our relationship with our own bodies.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPergamon Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom37
dc.relation.ispartofpageto44
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial Science and Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume123
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial and Community Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEconomics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Human Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170113
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode14
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode16
dc.titleApplying the contact hypothesis to anti-fat attitudes: Contact with overweight people is related to how we interact with our bodies and those of others
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBarlow, Fiona K.


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