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dc.contributor.authorBates, Lyndel
dc.contributor.editorTruong, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-28T12:01:00Z
dc.date.available2017-11-28T12:01:00Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.refurihttp://rsrpe2014.com.au/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/67711
dc.description.abstractRoad policing is an important component of programs designed to alter road user behaviour with the use of theory to underpin such programs becoming more prevalent. One theory that may be useful to examine in a road policing context is procedural justice. The concept of procedural justice suggests that how the police treat people when they interact with them is very important. Procedural justice has four elements: neutrality, respect, trust and voice. In interactions where the elements of procedural justice are present, individuals are more likely to comply with the directions of, and to cooperate with, the police. They are also more likely to see the police institution as legitimate. The concept of procedural justice has been applied and explored in a broad range of policing contexts but in a limited way within road policing. This paper considers the concept of procedural justice, explores what we know about its application to road policing and discusses some of the implications for road safety. The paper argues that more research is needed to identify the impact of procedurally just police interactions in a road policing context on both perceptions of police and road safety attitudes and behaviours.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent280892 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNo data provided
dc.publisher.urihttp://rsrpe2014.com.au/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameARSRPE 2014: It always seems impossible until it’s done
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the 2014 Australasian Road Safety Research, Policing & Education Conference
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2014-11-12
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2014-11-14
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMelbourne, Australia
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial and Community Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolice Administration, Procedures and Practice
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170113
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160205
dc.titleProcedural Justice and Road Policing: Is it important?
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2014. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBates, Lyndel J.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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