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dc.contributor.authorScheele, Ben C
dc.contributor.authorHunter, David A
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Laura F
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Lee
dc.contributor.authorKolby, Jon E
dc.contributor.authorMcfadden, Michael S
dc.contributor.authorMarantelli, Gerry
dc.contributor.authorSkerratt, Lee F
dc.contributor.authorDriscoll, Don A
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-15T23:40:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-15T23:40:19Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0888-8892
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cobi.12322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/67765
dc.description.abstractWildlife diseases pose an increasing threat to biodiversity and are a major management challenge. A striking example of this threat is the emergence of chytridiomycosis. Despite diagnosis of chytridiomycosis as an important driver of global amphibian declines 15 years ago, researchers have yet to devise effective large-scale management responses other than biosecurity measures to mitigate disease spread and the establishment of disease-free captive assurance colonies prior to or during disease outbreaks. We examined the development of management actions that can be implemented after an epidemic in surviving populations. We developed a conceptual framework with clear interventions to guide experimental management and applied research so that further extinctions of amphibian species threatened by chytridiomycosis might be prevented. Within our framework, there are 2 management approaches: reducing Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (the fungus that causes chytridiomycosis) in the environment or on amphibians and increasing the capacity of populations to persist despite increased mortality from disease. The latter approach emphasizes that mitigation does not necessarily need to focus on reducing disease-associated mortality. We propose promising management actions that can be implemented and tested based on current knowledge and that include habitat manipulation, antifungal treatments, animal translocation, bioaugmentation, head starting, and selection for resistance. Case studies where these strategies are being implemented will demonstrate their potential to save critically endangered species.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1195
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1205
dc.relation.ispartofeditionOctober
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalConservation Biology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchConservation and Biodiversity
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.titleInterventions for Reducing Extinction Risk in Chytridiomycosis-Threatened Amphibians
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Society for Conservation Biology. Publisher by Wiley-Blackwell. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGrogan, Laura F.


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