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dc.contributor.authorJamieson-Proctor, Romaniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Petreaen_US
dc.contributor.authorZagami, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlbion, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorTwining, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.editorACCEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:30:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:30:59Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.refurihttp://acec2014.acce.edu.au/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/67966
dc.description.abstractAs curricula change, so must the tools used by learners and teachers and the plethora of mobile digital devices will likely play a major role in redefining education. The Digital Education Revolution (DER), with funding of more than $2 billion, was intended to provide Australian students with a world-class education system underpinned by the effective use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). In Queensland, DER funding provided 141 000 laptops to students in Years 9-12. However, now that DER funding has ended, the Queensland government and schools are considering BYOD options, in order to maintain a 1:1 ratio of computers to students. This paper reports the progress made by three Queensland schools with the use of mobile digital devices, whether supplied by the schools or the students themselves, and outlines significant positive outcomes and challenges experienced by these schools as a guide to other schools when embarking on mobile digital initiatives. Further, the study is framed within the methodological context of the Vital Case Studies undertaken in England (http://edfutures.net/Research_Strategy) and draws comparisons between the results of those studies and other schools across Australia involved in the Australian Snapshot Studies.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent1070380 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherACCEen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://acec2014.acce.edu.au/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameACEC2014: “Now It’s Personal”en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle26th Australian Computers in Education Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2014-09-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2014-10-03en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAdelaide, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionNen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducational Technology and Computingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130306en_US
dc.titleRedefining Education for the Digital Age: A Snapshot of the State of Play in three Queensland Schoolsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Australian Council for Computers Education. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorZagami, Jason A.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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