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dc.contributor.authorSerrao-Neurnann, S
dc.contributor.authorSchuch, G
dc.contributor.authorHarman, B
dc.contributor.authorCrick, F
dc.contributor.authorSano, M
dc.contributor.authorSahin, O
dc.contributor.authorvan Staden, R
dc.contributor.authorBaum, S
dc.contributor.authorChoy, D Low
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-18T01:30:24Z
dc.date.available2018-07-18T01:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0016-3287
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.futures.2014.08.011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/68823
dc.description.abstractThe threat of climate change demands that human settlements adapt to unavoidable impacts. Climate change is a complex problem that requires traditional disciplines to work together to facilitate an integrated and coordinated response to its impacts. Transdisciplinary research approaches have been recognised for being well placed to aid responses to complex problems such as climate change. This paper draws on the experience of the South East Queensland Climate Adaptation Research Initiative (SEQCARI), Australia, to reflect upon the challenges involved in undertaking transdisciplinary research aimed at developing and improving a range of adaptation options for specific sectors as well as across sectors. Challenges and learning's are discussed based on the three phases of transdisciplinary research processes: problem framing and team building, co-creation of solution-oriented transferable knowledge, and (re)integration and application of created knowledge. Four key insights are then discussed to advance transdisciplinary research approaches for climate change adaptation: adoption of a dynamic learning approach such as learning-by-doing/ doing-by-learning to provide sufficient flexibility and scope to navigate potential barriers and conflicts; selection of social sciences to drive integration; choice of one sector as a platform for integration; and acknowledgement of existing barriers and limitations associated with the political context in which the research takes place.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto13
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFutures
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban Policy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160514
dc.titleOne human settlement: A transdisciplinary approach to climate change adaptation research
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Environment and Science
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorLow Choy, Darryl C.
gro.griffith.authorSchuch, Gemma C.
gro.griffith.authorSahin, Oz
gro.griffith.authorBaum, Scott
gro.griffith.authorSano, Marcello
gro.griffith.authorSerrao-Neumann, Silvia
gro.griffith.authorVan Staden, Rudi C.


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