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dc.contributor.authorGoris, An
dc.contributor.authorvan Setten, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorDiekstra, Frank
dc.contributor.authorRipke, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorPatsopoulos, Nikolaos
dc.contributor.authorSawcer, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorMultiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium, The International
dc.contributor.authorvan Es, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBroadley, Simon
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMelki, Judith
dc.contributor.authorMeininger, Vincent
dc.contributor.authoret al.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:21:56Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:21:56Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0964-6906
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/hmg/ddt574
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/68842
dc.description.abstractGenome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying common variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. From these studies, it has emerged that there is substantial overlap in susceptibility loci between diseases. In line with those findings, we hypothesized that shared genetic pathways may exist between multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While both diseases may have inflammatory and neurodegenerative features, epidemiological studies have indicated an increased co-occurrence within individuals and families. To this purpose, we combined genome-wide data from 4088 MS patients, 3762 ALS patients and 12 030 healthy control individuals in whom 5 440 446 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were successfully genotyped or imputed. We tested these SNPs for the excess association shared between MS and ALS and also explored whether polygenic models of SNPs below genome-wide significance could explain some of the observed trait variance between diseases. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of SNPs as well as polygenic analyses fails to provide evidence in favor of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between MS and ALS. Hence, our findings do not support a shared genetic background of common risk variants in MS and ALS.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1916
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1922
dc.relation.ispartofissue7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHuman Molecular Genetics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleNo evidence for shared genetic basis of common variants in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBroadley, Simon


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